Parsippany’s Director and Conductor Matthew Paterno: Trumpets to Sound at Bickford Theatre

Michael R. Baker

MORRIS COUNTY —Here’s some sound advice on how to spend a midwinter Sunday afternoon: Stop by the Morris Museum to see the exhibit called “Trumpets Weird & Wonderful: Treasures from the National Music Museum,” followed by a fabulous concert by the Hanover Wind Symphony at the museum’s Bickford Theatre at 2:00 p.m. on Sunday, February 10. The HWS concert is called “And the Trumpets Shall Sound.”

The Morris Museum, which opens at noon on Sunday, and the Bickford Theatre are located at 6 Normandy Heights Road, Morristown.

Says HWS music director and conductor Matthew Paterno of Parsippany, “This concert promises to be a wonderful complement to the museum’s ‘Trumpets, Weird and Wonderful: Treasures from the National Music Museum’ exhibit. We are proud to feature professional trumpet/cornet player Michael R. Baker as well as some great band literature that highlights the HWS trumpet section.”

The Hanover Wind Symphony “And the Trumpets Shall Sound” program will include:

  • Galactic Fanfare by Randall D. Standridge
  • At Morning’s First Light by David R. Gillingham
  • Concerto for Trumpet and Symphonic Band by Alexander Arutiunian, with a solo by Michael R. Baker on the trumpet
  • Danzon by Leonard Bernstein, with associate music director and conductor Kurt Zimmermann of Rockaway conducting
  • Ride by Samuel R. Hazo, with Richard Barriers conducting
  • Willow Echoes by Frank Simon, with a solo by Michael R. Baker on the cornet
  • Gabriel’s Oboe by Ennio Morricone, arranged by Robert Longfield, with a solo by Michael R. Baker on the piccolo trumpet
  • The Falls by Rossano Galante

HWS soloist Michael R. Baker began his studies on the cornet at the Salvation Army with Derek Smith at the age of nine. He holds both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the Juilliard School, where he studied trumpet with Philip Smith, Mark Gould and Edward Treutel. Besides his second trumpet position with the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, he is a busy freelance musician in the New York area, playing with the New York Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera. He has also performed in the orchestra of several shows on Broadway. Baker is also a member of the prestigious Brass Band of Battle Creek.

He can be heard on many recordings of the New York Philharmonic, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, and both the Montclair Citadel Band and the New York Staff Band of the Salvation Army. The guest soloist teaches trumpet at William Paterson University in Wayne. Baker has performed as a soloist in America, Japan, Australia, the UK, Canada, Norway, Sweden, and Korea. In 2014, Baker was a guest soloist at the International Trumpet Guild Conference.

The Hanover Wind Symphony is a unique extension of the great American tradition of adult music performance. One of only a handful of outstanding community-based adult wind bands in New Jersey, the Hanover Wind Symphony delights audiences of all ages by giving a contemporary twist to traditional favorites. The large orchestra, made up exclusively of woodwind, brass and percussion instruments, embraces as its mission bringing “music to people and people to music.”

For more than 30 years, the Hanover Wind Symphony has played to enthusiastic audiences. HWS members are volunteers who share a love for music and a passion for enriching the cultural fabric of the community with the thrill of live wind band performances.

By day, HWS members are accountants, engineers, teachers and executives. They come together to connect musically with others, share the enjoyment of music with live audiences, and help mentor the next generation of wind musicians.

Tickets to “And the Trumpets Shall Sound” are $25.00 general admission; $20.00 for seniors, Morris Museum members and Theatre Guild members; and $15.00 for students (18 and under or with a valid college ID). Call (973) 971-3706 for reservations. For an additional $3, concert attendees can tour the museum’s exhibit called “Trumpets Weird & Wonderful: Treasures from the National Music Museum.”

For further information about the Hanover Wind Symphony click here.

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