Court Officer indicted on theft charges; official misconduct

ForsbreyActing Morris County Prosecutor Fredric M. Knapp announces that Scott Forsbrey, 52, Randolph, was indicted after an investigation revealed that he allegedly converted approximately $112,000 from monies he collected in executing upon levies for judgment creditors. 

These monies were in excess of the amounts he was permitted to retain for a commission as a Morris County Special Civil Part Court Officer in collecting the judgments and were in actuality proceeds which should have been turned over to creditors.            

In January 2013, the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office received an allegation of theft concerning Morris County Special Civil Part Court Officer Scott Forsbrey.  Officer Forsbrey was responsible for collecting funds owed as a result of civil judgments and for forwarding the monies to the litigants who obtained the judgments.  He was legally permitted to keep only a small percentage of funds collected as a commission.  An internal audit conducted by the Administrative Office of the Courts concluded that between January, 2010 and May, 2012, Officer Forsbrey converted approximately $112,000 in excess of the amount he was permitted to retain in commissions.  Officer Forsbrey resigned after the audit.  He had served as an officer from November 4, 2009 to May 3, 2012.

Defendant was indicted on two counts of Second Degree Official Misconduct and one count of Second Degree Theft by Failure to Make Required Disposition.

The State is represented by Assistant Prosecutor/SDAG Sahil Kabse in this matter.

Anyone with information relating to these charges is urged to contact Sergeant Steven Murzenski of the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Professional Standards Unit at (973) 285-6200.

Acting Prosecutor Knapp thanks the Administrative Office of the Courts and the Morris County Prosecutor’s Office Professional Standards Unit, whose efforts contributed to this result.

The charges and allegations contained in the indictment are merely accusations, and the defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Comments

Comments